All posts by Danny Bednar

Second Climate Change Adaptation and Governance Report Released

A report summarizing a workshop I held with colleagues from Simon Fraser University in Vancouver is now online.

Like my other work, the workshop engaged the broad question of “who should do how with which instruments for climate change adaptation”. Unique from my other work however, this meeting focused on the British Columbia context.

The report is available on the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT) website.

A big thank you ro Deb Harford, Willem Peters, Jack Satzewich, and my supervisor Gordon McBean for all their hard work with the workshop and the report.

Cover image courtesy of V.Birkus on pixabay.com

Critical Geographies of Outer Space Session at AAG 2018: New Orleans

The full preliminary program for the 2018 Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting has been released here.

The AAG is the largest gathering of geographers in the world, and for the fourth straight year, myself and Dr. Julie Klinger are hosting a session on the Critical Geographies of Outer Space.

Our session will take place at 5:20 PM THURSDAY April 12th in Napoleon A3 at the Sheraton (3rd Floor).

Here are the paper presentations we will have in the session.


Danny Bednar, PhD Candidate & Lecturer, Western University, Department of Geography

  • Deconstructing and Constructing the Outer Space Treaty for Critical Environmental Geopolitics

Megan O’Kane, PhD Student, Queen’s University Belfast, School of Natural and Built Environment

  • The Ludic Geopolitics of Extraterrestrial Videogame Spaces

Dr. Rory Rowan, University of Zurich, Department of Geography

  • The NewSpace State: The Commercial Space Sector and State Formation in Outer Space

Dr. Julie Klinger, Boston University, Frederick S. Pardee School Of Global Studies

  • Discussant

See you in New Orleans!

 

 

Podcast: Western Gradcast Lunar Special

In order to promote this Saturday’s International Observe the Moon event here at Western University, myself along with colleagues Zach Morse and Patrick Hill recorded a special edition of Gradcast all about the Moon.

Gradcast is the podcast and radio show of the Society of Graduate Students (SOGS) here at Western.

The episode can be downloaded here.

For those interested in the public event, this Saturday the 28th, details can be found here.

Thanks again to everyone involved for putting this together and I hope you enjoy the show.

Here’s how it breaks down:

00:00 – 6:34 Introductions and International Observe the Moon Night at Western info.

6:35 – 15:20 Lunar/Planetary Science Facts and Discussion

15:21 – 28:09 We answer common questions about the Moon

 

New Podcast: Talking Climate Change Adaptation, Geography, and the Outer Space Treaty

As part of the local Campus radio (CHRW 94.9) I recently took part in the Gradcast Radio podcast to discuss, among other things, my PhD work on climate change adaptation in Canada.

The podcast can be downloaded here

Here’s how the conversation breaks down:

00:00 – 14:47 – What is Climate Change Adaptation and how are governments in Canada taking action?

14:48 – 22:16 – What is Geography (at the university level) and how do we “make places”?

22:17 – 27:20 – What is the Outer Space Treaty and how are we making places…in space?

Thanks again to Roger, Navaneeth and the Gradcast production team for having me, it was a blast.

Public Talk: The Outer Space Treaty at 50: What’s in it, and Where is it Going?

 

I will be giving a public talk as part of the Centre for Planetary Science and Exploration at Western University weekly forum on the topic of the 50th anniversary of the Outer Space Treaty.

Talk Summary: October 10th, 2017, marked 50 years since the Outer Space Treaty entered into force. In it’s five decades, the treaty has been signed by 105 nations, including every space-faring government in the world and is often referred to as the single most important document related to outer space politics. While the treaty has been noted for it’s optimistic language that focuses on international cooperation and scientific exploration, it has also been contested by a variety of long-standing and emerging interests within the broader space community.What exactly is in the treaty and what parts are contested? This talk will cover the major components of the Outer Space Treaty, focusing mostly on Articles I-X. Further, current and future interests such as those related to orbital debris mitigation, resource extraction, off-Earth colonization, and increased militarization will be discussed regarding future challenges for the OST and the continuing debate of who, and what, space is for.

October 20th, 12:30 PM, Western University, Physics and Astronomy Building, Rm. 100